Filed under: Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts

Ten tech tools that connect you to city gov

Engaging with City government should be easy as 1-2-3, so the City of Asheville is always looking for ways that tech can help keep up the connection, make life easier and create community opportunity.computer

Here are 10 ways you can use tech to connect with your city government:

Pay-by-phone parking – Launched as a pilot program in 2012 and expanded to all city metered spaces the next year, Pay-By-Phone parking continues to provide convenient and change-free parking options on the streets of Asheville. Thousands of people use the service each month, 7,000 in October alone! To try it out, just follow the instructions on the parking meter!

NextBus – When’s the next bus coming to your stop? That question has gotten easier to answer since the city’s Transit Division launched the NextBus service over the summer. From your phone, just text “nextART” and the number on your bus stop to “41411” or go to www.nextbus.com/art on your smart phone to find out just when the next bus will be there. You can also call (828) 253-5691 x5 and enter the number on your bus stop to hear when your bus will arrive. Signs are at all Ride the ART stops; look for the green and blue circle. Or use your home computer if you already know your stop number and avoid a long wait at the stop!

Asheville App – The Asheville App works on the idea that, when it comes to spotting areas of the city that need attention, more eyes are better than few. You spot it, we fix it. From potholes to overgrown lots to damaged street signs, the app allows residents to report problems, upload pictures and track our progress on fixing the issue. Users can access the Asheville App from their computer or smartphone, and anyone can see what is being reported and how city personnel respond.

Online Development Portal – Time equals money, especially in the world of development, and this online tool is a real time saver. Pull construction related permits, make payments and track permit progress all online. For many basic permit types, no more in-person visits are needed. You can use the portal to schedule inspections 24 hours a day, receive confirmation of scheduling and see inspections results.

Online City Council meetings, both live and on-demand (psst…you can also search Council minutes here)

Graffiti Dashboard – When the City of Asheville began its 123 Graffiti Free removal assistance program, we knew it would be important for the public to track our progress. The dashboard shows the number of requests for cleanup assistance, how many have been completed, and how much of the money allocated by City Council has been spent. The dashboard’s design and ease of use earned it a place among the finalists for the North Carolina Technology Association’s 2014 Tech Awards.

Crime Mapper – Safety and quality of life means knowing what is going on in your neighborhood. The Crime Mapper on mapAsheville is updated with current calls for service from both the Asheville Police Department and the Buncombe County Sheriff’s Office and can zoom in on specific areas or sort crime info by neighborhood.

TreeMapper – Crowd-sourced tree info! Customized by the city’s Information Technology Services and the Tree Commission from open source software, the online map is designed to increase knowledge of trees in the area, highlight their benefits to the community and enhance the way we think about trees.

Online picnic shelter reservations and recreation program registration. – You don’t have to jump through hoops to sign up for one of Asheville Parks and Recreation’s many programs, or to reserve a picnic shelter for that birthday party or family reunion. Just sign up online!

Email utility bills and automatic bill payment – Green and easy! You don’t need to get a paper utility bill. By signing up, you can receive your bill by email and even choose to have an automatic draft when the bills come out.

Leave a Comment November 18, 2014

Harvest House celebrates 50 years of community

The Harvest House Community Center on Kenilworth Road turned the big 5-0 this year, and to hear people talk, it has never been better. The senior center, known for its large selection of activities, classes and events, has built an impressive following over its five decades.
IMG_0526“The overlaying spirit is that everyone is happy to have this place,” said Alan Kaufman at the center’s birthday celebration. “Everyone here is welcoming.”

Kaufman, an artist who regularly uses the center’s fully-equipped woodworking shop, says the center’s community is as important as its resources.

“I have all the tools I need here, but I already have most of these at home. I come here for the camaraderie,” he says. Kaufman adds that it’s not only seniors who use the facility, and that the Harvest House is open to any age group. “There are young people who come here too,” he says.

IMG_0519Center Director Lee Dansby says the Harvest House has as many as 300 regular visitors who participate in everything from weaving classes and line dancing to pool games and Tai Chi. Groups form to play card games or Scrabble on a regular basis and to catch up with one another. “There is a real sense of community that forms with all of these groups,” she says.

At 50, Harvest House has a long history in the city of Asheville. The building on Kenilworth Road was erected in 1925 as a retail space, and had several different uses before it was converted to a community center by the Junior League of Asheville in 1964. The next year, the league donated the center to the City of Asheville.

IMG_0541Harvest House organizes regular day trips, pot lucks and lunch outings for seniors and offers anything from book clubs and card games to outdoor shuffle board. It was the recent site for an arts and crafts expo and regularly hosts area entertainers.

And, Dansby adds, the people who use the center add to the atmosphere with contributions of time and skills. One Harvest House regular refelts the pool tables when needed while another restored a player piano and donated it to the center. Game nights and book clubs are led by enthusiasts who take it upon themselves to keep up with calendars and manage lists of participants. “Every group tends to evolve to have its own leaders,” Dansby says.

Elenore Lemey, who herself leads a bookclub but also enjoys playing in with ladies pool group, agrees.
IMG_0533“Harvest House offers a lot that interests people. It is a special place because people make fast friends here. It promotes camaraderie and a feeling of well-being.”

Harvest House is operated by the City of Asheville Parks and Recreation Department, and, alongside the Senior Opportunity Center at 36 Grove Street, is one of two community centers specializing in programming for seniors. For more information, call (828) 350-2051 or visit the Parks and Recreation website.

Leave a Comment September 23, 2014

City recreation centers now offer free Wi-Fi

City of Asheville recreation centers are places for community-strengthening activities like student enrichment programs and neighborhood information meetings. So providing wireless internet fits perfectly into their mission, says Debbie Ivester, Assistant Director of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department.

“People come to our recreation centers to connect with our services, each other, and the community,” Ivester says. “So being able to connect to the internet makes these facilities much more comprehensive. It was one of the most frequent requests we got.”

randyshaw

Randy Shaw, Director of the Dr. Wesley Grant Sr. Southside Center logs on to WiFi in the center’s lobby.

Over the summer, Wi-Fi was installed in eight city facilities: the Dr. Wesley Grant Sr. Southside Center, Stephens-Lee, LinwoodCrump-ShilohCenter, Burton Street, Montford, the Harvest House, the SeniorOpportunityCenter and the AstonParkTennisCenter.

Randy Shaw, Director at the Dr. Wesley Grant Sr.,  Southside Center, said the center’s after school programs like the teen leadership program for 6-9th graders are examples of where WiFi can help.

“Some students need internet access to complete homework assignments,” Shaw says. And since the Grant Center often hosts public meetings, he says, attendees can use WiFi on their devices to get information out to friends in the community.

Shaw said he hopes that people in the surrounding neighborhoods who don’t have internet access will see the resource as a chance to plug into resources in the community.

“Internet access really is a fundamental part of our society, whether it’s looking for jobs, looking for housing or finding out information about city services,” Shaw said. “It really is another element to help us better serve the community.”

Wireless internet at City of Asheville Recreation Centers can be accessed during center hours by speaking to a center staff member.

Leave a Comment September 4, 2014

Checking in on the Lake Craig/Azalea Road project

TimBayless

Six months in and the Lake Craig/Azalea Road project is well underway as specialized contractors begin the highly visible streambed relocation along the Swannanoa River at Gashes Creek Road.

Despite the scale of this project to manage high waters during floods and install infrastructure improvements and roadway access, the facilities at Recreation Park such as the picnic area, pool and the WNC Nature Center remain open to the public.

“This is a big project, but we understand that as we move into the summer, people are going to want to use this park,” said Stormwater Services Manager McCray Coates. “There are designated construction areas in place which will allow the park to remain usable.” Access to the river at the park will be limited as work begins on the streambed relocation this week, Coates says. “We do want people to stay out of the construction area,” he said.

Keeping the project rolling involves managing several specific tasks at the same time:

Riverbend

One of the main fixtures of the project is the relocation of the streambed next to Recreation Park. The section currently has a sharp turn that, during high water, erodes and potentially undermines the embankment beneath Azalea Road. A contractor has already cleared vegetation along to site and begun moving fill from one bank to the other and over the next few weeks, work will increase at that site.

newriver

Straightening the bend in the river will ease erosion on the bank, while boulders placed in the streambed will slow water as it moves downstream.

picnic

Park amenities like picnic pavilions and the Recreation Park Pool are still open for the park’s most popular season.

bridge pilings

Crews have completed pilings for a bridge that will tie into the new roadway connecting the John B. Lewis Soccer Complex with Gashes Creek Road, a move that will introduce a smoother traffic pattern and incorporate infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists. Next, crews will begin building the bridge abutments for the 150-foot bridge span across the Swannanoa River.

loweredplain

The construction team is removing fill from a plain that runs along the river, a move that will allow water a place to go in cases of high flood waters.

compacting

On the other side of the Swannanoa River, trucks are compacting dirt along the future site of the road that will connect to the John B. Lewis Soccer Complex.

roadtiein

Work on phase one of the Lake Craig/Azalea Road project is anticipated to be complete in December. Click here more information.

Leave a Comment June 9, 2014

Irvine and Wilkinson picked for 51 Biltmore Public Art Project

The City of Asheville announces the artwork selection for the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project to be located on the north exterior of the public parking deck next to the Aloft Hotel at 51 Biltmore in downtown Asheville. The mural of a woman surrounded by a background of an art deco horseshoe by the artist team Alex Irvine and Ian Wilkinson was chosen by the Selection Panel.
Photo.51 Biltmore Public Art Project
The 51 Biltmore Public Art Project began in 2013 with a call for artist qualifications which received over 150 applications, and three finalists were selected. The artists’ proposals were reviewed through a series of public input sessions and the citizen Selection Panel made the final selection. See background about the selection process here. Installation of the mural is expected in the summer of 2014. Follow the project progress here.

“The 51 Biltmore Public Art Project presents a wonderful opportunity to expand our public art collection, and initiate opportunities for local artists through a public process,” said Brenda Mills, economic development specialist of the City of Asheville. “Over 500 people gave us feedback on the artwork proposals which is clearly demonstrated in the Selection Panel’s final choice of artwork. “

Artists Alex Irvine and Ian Wilkinson teamed up to create a stylized mural using painted surface and ceramic tile that speaks to both the modern architecture of the Aloft Hotel and to Asheville’s historical terracotta buildings. The mural features a central figure of a woman as a daydreamer as she looks out over downtown Asheville as a place where creativity flourishes. In the background, an inverted art deco horseshoe pattern references the historic location of Asheville’s farrier trade.

Formerly of Asheville and now residing in New Mexico, Irvin’s ceramic tile murals can be found in prominent displays in Asheville including Hall Fletcher Elementary School, the Odyssey Center for Ceramics, and the Mission Hospital Donor Recognition Wall. “This is a dream come true to be back in Asheville,” Irvin said about the opportunity to return to Asheville. “Working late nights in a River Arts District studio, hovering above the downtown sidewalk on scaffolding, trowel and tile in hand, working next to a great friend… that is my dream job. I am really grateful for this opportunity.”

Known for his painted murals in Asheville, local artist Wilkinson states, “We are very thankful for this opportunity to collaborate again, and make something amazing for this city that we love so much. We are ready to work and make something great!” Samples of Wilkinson’s murals can be seen at Hall Fletcher and Claxton Elementary Schools, the Cotton Mill in the River Art District, and in the Asheville Mural Project in Triangle Park.

The City of Asheville Public Art Program oversees Asheville’s public art collection. The Public Art and Cultural Commission is responsible for approving the site and content of public art, and the development of an inclusive selection process that involves community feedback. Members also act as public art ambassadors by advancing the City of Asheville as an “arts destination” in cultural and economic development efforts.

The city’s public art collection includes the popular Urban Trail, a historic walking tour of downtown Asheville; along with other prominent works in the downtown area including but not limited to the Pack Fountain, Energy Loop, Deco Gecko and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The 51 Biltmore Public Art Project is part of the City’s Percent for Art Program.

For information about the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project, contact Basil Punsalan at 828-259-5552 or bpunsalan@ashevillenc.gov.

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Leave a Comment May 5, 2014

Register now for the Senior Games and Silver Arts Showcase!

It’s time again for the Senior Games! Here’s the registration info from the City of Asheville Parks and Recreation Department:

senio0rgames
Asheville-Buncombe Senior Games & The Silver Arts Showcase
May 13-June 3, 2014

The 2014 Asheville-Buncombe Senior Games are fast approaching! Competitors from around the area will gather for a few unforgettable weeks of athleticism and fun. Spend your morning shaking it up on the shuffleboard court, and your afternoon hitting the track. Pummel your peers in racquetball and spend the afternoon watching your buddies in a game of Pickleball. The possibilities are endless, and even if you don’t bring home a medal, the memories are all yours to keep.

Are you the more artistic type? The Silver Arts Showcase, a major component of the Asheville-Buncombe Senior Games, is the perfect time for you to debut your latest masterpiece or hit the stage with your musical skills.

Click below for more information for these exciting events!

Asheville-Buncombe Senior Games 2014 Application and Information

Asheville-Buncombe Senior Games 2014 Schedule

Silver Arts Showcase 2014 Application and Information

Questions? Contact Dee Black at 828-259-5809 or dblack@ashevillenc.gov\

Leave a Comment April 9, 2014

An eye for art at 51 Biltmore ***UPDATED***

51biltmore

Here’s the news on the next step in the public input process for the public art project at 51 Biltmore. From the Parks and Recreation Department:

CITY OF ASHEVILLE SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT ON PUBLIC ART

51 Biltmore Public Art Project

Asheville, NC – The City of Asheville is developing Asheville’s next public art in the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project on the exterior of the public parking garage next to the Aloft Hotel at 51 Biltmore Avenue in downtown Asheville.

The next public comment period for the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project begins on April 4 with the First Friday Gallery Walk in downtown Asheville. The artists’ proposals will be on display at the Blue Spiral 1, 38 Biltmore Avenue, 5:00 to 8:00 pm during the Gallery Walk, and continue through April 6 during regular business hours. April 7 – 11 the proposals will be on display at the Aloft Hotel in the second floor lobby, 51 Biltmore Avenue, during regular operating hours. The public is invited to review and make comment on the proposals, with the option to select their preferred design. Comment can also be made on line at the City of Asheville website at www.ashevillenc.gov/parks during April 4-11.

“More than 50 people showed up at the first public forum in January and we received great input to support the artists’ concepts,” said Brenda Mills, Economic Development Specialist. “We want to continue the momentum with this week-long opportunity to help choose Asheville’s next piece of public art.”

Public input on the artists’ proposals will constitute 25% of the selection process. In addition to public comment, the Selection Panel will consider artistic merit, originality, appropriateness for the site; and practical factors such as maintenance, feasibility and budget.

The City issued a call for artists in September 2013. The finalists were chosen by a Selection Panel from an application pool of over 150 artists. The Public Art and Cultural Commission hosted a forum in January 2014 in which the public could meet the artists and provide comment to inspire them in their design proposals. Once the second round of public comment is complete, the Selection Panel will choose the final artwork. The public art installation is expected to be complete in fall 2014.

For more background on the selection process, and to see the artists’ proposals, go to the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project Page at www.ashevillenc.gov/parks. For more information contact Basil Punsalan at 828-259-5552 or bpunsalan@ashevillenc.gov.

The City of Asheville Public Art Program oversees Asheville’s public art collection. The Public Art and Cultural Commission is responsible for approving the site and content of public art, and the development of an inclusive selection process that involves community feedback. Members also act as public art ambassadors by advancing the City of Asheville as an “arts destination” in cultural and economic development efforts.

And here’s the background on what has already happened:

The City of Asheville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department announces the next step for a public art project for 51 Biltmore.Click here to see more on this project, including examples of the finalists’ work.

CITY OF ASHEVILLE SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT ON PUBLIC ART: 51 Biltmore Public Art Project

51 Biltmore

The parking deck wall at 51 Biltmore awaits its new look.

Asheville, NC – The City of Asheville announces the top artist finalists for the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project to be installed on the exterior wall of the pubic parking garage next to the Aloft Hotel at 51 Biltmore Avenue in downtown Asheville. The Public Art and Cultural Commission (PACC) will host a public forum with the artists on Friday, January 24, 5:30 to 7:30 pm at the Trinity Episcopal Church located at 60 Church Street. Parking is located on the south side of the church and across the street. Enter the church at the Church Street entrance to Tuton Hall.

The following are the top artist finalists:
Artist team Alex Irvine (Santa Fe, NM) and Ian Wilkinson (Asheville, NC)
Marc Archambault (Asheville, NC)
Mike Allison (Joelton, TN)

At the public forum, the artists will be in attendance and seeking ideas, images and stories to inspire their design proposals for the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project. To learn more about each artist and to make comment, go to the City of Asheville’s website at www.ashevillenc.gov and select City Projects to see project under Central Business District. The final design proposals are expected to be revealed in April, followed by a second round of public feedback to assist the Selection Panel in choosing the final design for the public art project.

The City of Asheville recently conducted a call for artists to create a permanent public art feature for the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project. After reviewing over 150 artist applications, the Selection Panel selected the top artist finalists.

The 51 Biltmore Public Art Project Selection Panel:
David McCartney, Aloft Hotel
Sharon Trammel, Public Art and Cultural Commission
Jenny Bowen, Asheville Artist and Photographer
Elizabeth Barr, Asheville Artist Resource Center
Susie Millions, Asheville Visual Artist
Sarah Larson, 51 Biltmore Neighborhood Resident and Art Advocate

The City of Asheville Public Art Program oversees Asheville’s public art collection. The Public Art and Cultural Commission is responsible for approving the site and content of public art, and the development of an inclusive selection process that involves community feedback. Members also act as public art ambassadors by advancing the City of Asheville as an “arts destination” in cultural and economic development efforts.

The city’s public art collection includes the popular Urban Trail, a historic walking tour of downtown Asheville; along with other prominent works in the downtown area including but not limited to the Pack Fountain, Energy Loop, Deco Gecko and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The 51 Biltmore Public Art Project is part of the City’s Percent for Art Program.

For information about the 51 Biltmore Public Art Project, contact Basil Punsalan at 828-259-5552 or bpunsalan@ashevillenc.gov.

Leave a Comment March 27, 2014

Public input wanted for improvements at Carrier Park’s velodrome

The velodrome at Carrier Park is a popular attraction for bicyclists, walkers, joggers and inline skaters alike. Now the city’s Park and Recreation Department, with the help of community groups, is looking at ways to make the track even better and more accessible to everyone. A March 20 drop-in event will give the public a chance to hear about those improvements and give feedback to city staff. See the full announcement below.

velodrome

The City of Asheville Parks and Recreation Department in collaboration with the Asheville Bicycle Racing Club and VeloSports Racing is hosting a public drop-in event on Thursday, March 20, 2014 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Dr. Wesley Grant, Sr. Southside Center, located at 285 Livingston Street, to gain input on proposed renovations for the Velodrome at Carrier Park. The proposed renovations, which include resurfacing and increased safety measures, were generated by members of the local cycling community including Olympic silver medalist Lauren Tamayo and United Health Care Pro Cycling Team General Manager Mike Tamayo through a six-month focus group process.

The Velodrome, known to many locals as the “Mellowdrome”, is a multi-use facility located in Carrier Park that is enjoyed by walkers, runners, inline skaters, and cyclists alike. The skill level of cyclists ranges from young children and recreational cyclists to elite athletes training for competition. VeloSports Racing produces “The Ring of Fire”, a popular racing series held at the park.

For more information, contact Debbie Ivester at 259-5804, or divester@ashevillenc.gov.

Leave a Comment March 12, 2014

Montford Center reopens gym after renovations, celebration March 13

Bring your A-game! The Montford Recreation Center gymnasium, closed for renovations since August, has reopened and reintroduced programming to the newly unveiled facility. The improvements include a new maple wood sports flooring system as well as competition-level fiberglass backboards with breakaway goals, wall pads and bleachers.

New wallpads and bleachers make the facility top-notch for players and spectators.

New wallpads and bleachers make the facility top-notch for players and spectators.

The renovations were completed in early February, and athletic groups are once again playing sports like basketball, volleyball, badminton and table tennis at the center. The climbing wall is also back in use, with a new textured paint job that better simulates a rock surface.

“We are so excited to have this popular facility reopened and the renovations are fantastic,” said Center Director Kim Kennedy.

A new floor, new baskets and backboards and LED lighting are highlights of the Montford Center's reopened gymnasium

A new floor, new baskets and backboards and LED lighting are highlights of the Montford Center’s reopened gymnasium

The gymnasium also got a new paint job and new LED lighting. The LEDs save an estimated $6,500 a year in electric costs and have a positive impact on carbon reduction equal to planting 24 football fields of forests. Additionally, the LEDs operate on a dimmer and have immediate turn-on, turn off capability. That saves even more energy, as the previous lighting took time to warm up and had to be left on all day. The LED replacement resulted in a $9,000 rebate from Duke Energy Progress – funding that will go into more sustainable upgrades in parks facilities.

The Montford Recreation Center entrances will soon be replaced to improve accessibility and bathroom renovation designs are in the works, said Project Manager Pete Wall.

The City of Asheville Parks and Recreation Department has plans to make improvements to other recreation centers as funding becomes available, including the Linwood Crump Shiloh Complex and the Stephens-Lee Recreation Center.

The Montford Recreation Center will officially recognize the renovations and re-opening with a ribbon cutting on Thursday, March 13 at 4:00 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and see the work that has been done.

The climbing wall got a new coat of textured paint that better simulates rock

The climbing wall got a new coat of textured paint that better simulates rock

For information about programs at the Montford Center, go to www.ashevillenc.gov/parks.

Leave a Comment March 4, 2014

Azalea Road project improves flood management, park access

Things are happening along the Swannanoa River. The river banks adjacent to Azalea Road and Gashes Creek road are undergoing a makeover that will not only ease one stream bank at the City of Asheville’s Recreation Park, but will also relocate a section of the Swannanoa to have less impact during high water events. Since December, heavy earth moving equipment has been visible making changes to the landscape in the area that will greatly improve multimodal park access and safety.

Azaleasmall

What is it?

Phase I of the Lake Craig/Azalea Road Improvements Project is an effort to better manage high water during flood events and create new and improved infrastructure for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists at one of the City of Asheville’s most popular park complexes.

This flood control project involves lowering a streamside multi-use field to the east of the GashesCreekBridge to give high waters a place to expand when the Swannanoa crests its banks. Another step will install breaks to slow the water down as is passes through RecreationPark. Both moves protect property and infrastructure downstream. The relocation of the stream just west of the GashesCreekBridge will straighten a curve in the river, lessening the impact it has on the steep bank below Swannanoa River Road near the intersection with Azalea Road.  This will reduce stream bank erosion in that location and prevent undercutting of the roadway.

LCASmall

Why was this location chosen?

The SwannanoaRiver, flowing from BlackMountain to its confluence with the French BroadRiver in West Asheville, is one of Asheville’s major water corridors and can be greatly affected by heavy rain events. In past rain events, flooding on the SwannanoaRiver has affected BiltmoreVillage, Swannanoa River Road and surrounding businesses and residences.

Because of the surrounding park facilities, work can be conducted in the area with minimum disruption to businesses that line other parts of this section of the river.

The location is considered part on an ongoing flood remediation study by the Army Corps of Engineers, says the city’s Stormwater Services Manager McCray Coates.

An added benefit is the partnership with NCDOT to make improvements at the intersection of NC 81 and Azalea Road.  NCDOT plans to install a traffic signal and turn lane along NC 81 which will benefit users of the WNCNatureCenter, RecreationPark and the John B. Lewis Soccer Complex.

How does the new infrastructure fit in?

“When we have large projects like the stream bank improvement plan, it makes sense to combine these efforts and go after some needed sidewalks, waterline and roadway improvements while you are in there,” Coates said.  The City is also excited to be partnering with the NCDOT for the installation of a new traffic signal and turn lane at the intersection of NC 81 and Azalea Road.

Sidewalks, a bike path, road improvements and a one-way roadway facility down into the soccer complex will improve access to one of Asheville’s most popular park facilities. Additionally, the soccer complex will get a long-needed water line installed to serve the user of the facility.

detail

Detail from the plans for Phase I of the Azalea Road/Lake Craig Project

How is it funded?

Phase I of the Lake Craig/Azalea Road Improvements project is financed by a mix of state and City of Asheville funds. The total project cost is $3.7 million dollars.  The Hurricane Recovery Act of 2005 allocated funding for these types of projects, and covers $1,143,380 of the total project cost. The remainder is funded through the Sullivans Act funding in the amount of $2,748,002 and the city’s Water Resources Department ($371,127),

What’s next?

Phase I of the project is expected to be completed by December 2014. Leading up to the groundbreaking, project engineers and city staff held three community meetings to take input and inform the public about the impact of the construction and the benefits of the project’s completion. Special attention has been paid to coordinate and minimize the impact of construction during special events for the John B. Lewis Soccer Complex, the WNCNatureCenter and RecreationPark.

“We know this is an extremely popular area,” Coates said. “We don’t want this to interfere with any soccer tournaments or NatureCenter events. Summer is a big time around here.”

Asheville City Council approved Phase I of the Lake Craig/Azalea Road Improvement Project October 22, 2013.

Leave a Comment February 5, 2014

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