Tag: neighborhood profile

Neighborhood Profile: Shiloh Community

This is the latest in a series of profiles highlighting the City of Asheville’s vibrant and diverse neighborhoods. The City of Asheville maintains a list of neighborhoods who have registered as official organizations. Each month we will invite one of these to tell you in their own words a little more about the place they call home. If you are not sure if your neighborhood is on our listing, please contact Neighborhood Coordinator Marsha Stickford at mstickford@ashevillenc.gov.

Shiloh Community Association, Inc
Established October 3, 2000
Location: Shiloh Community is located in South Asheville and is loosely bordered by Hendersonville Road to the west and Sweeten Creek Road to east and north.

What qualities make your neighborhood unique?

Our Motto is “Building on the Legacy, Embracing the Future”

Shiloh is a historically Afro-American intact community established in the 1880’s. Many of the residents are related and their ancestors came from (old) Shiloh which was originally located on the present Biltmore Estate. Most of the homes are single dwellings with front porches. There are four churches in Shiloh. In the early years many people walked to their destinations which included downtown Asheville, Biltmore Village, Biltmore Forest, and Biltmore Estate to work. Shiloh was a thriving village community raising their families with economic stability and resources. This was done with child daycares, elder care homes, grocery stores, a dry-cleaners, auto mechanics, seamstress’s , caters, mid-wives, and lawn care providers.

Who are the people that make up your neighborhood?

For many years the population of Shiloh was mostly Afro-American. Today Shiloh is more diverse with low income to middleclass working residents. There are generations of families still living in Shiloh since the 1880’s. We have people who are teachers, domestic workers, chiefs, judges, lawyers, ministers, and other professional and nonprofessional workers.

What is some of your neighborhood history?

Shiloh (a biblical name generally denoting the Messiah, or the Peaceful One) is the last intact Afro-American community in Asheville, established before 1870 and originally located where the Biltmore Estate is today. In the 1880’s Shiloh was moved to the present location. In 1927, a new, six-room elementary school was erected on a 5-acre site on Shiloh Road next to Shiloh Church. The school was built with public money and a large contribution from the Rosenwald Fund, founded by Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck & Company. The Shiloh AME Zion Church was established in old Shiloh (on the Biltmore Estate). Mr. George Vanderbilt bought the land in the late 1880’s and moved the community, the church, and the church cemetery to the current location. We have seen many changes with the increase of commercial businesses, roadway encroachments, and rezoning and development. The Shiloh Community League (1940’s-1970’s) land located at 59 Hampton St. was donated to the Shiloh Community Association in 2005 for the Community Garden.

What role does your neighborhood play as part of Asheville’s community?

Shiloh is becoming a healthier community through improved housing, health education, exercise, organic gardening, and shared intergenerational activities. Our community role is to work with other neighborhoods to ensure that all are safe, thriving, and effectively meeting the needs of its citizens. We aim to be active in city government through collaboration with our governing bodies and surrounding resources.

What are some of the things you look forward to in the future of your neighborhood?

Continue to progressively implement our 2025 Plan (adopted by City Council September 14, 2010) by completing the Shiloh Community garden amphitheater in partnership with Tupelo Honey Café, develop planned sidewalks, increase street lighting, create more livable wage jobs for residents, reestablish community watch. Continue our partnerships with City of Asheville Parks and Recreation, Police Department, Planning Department, Transit Department and Buncombe County Health Department. Other partnerships include: Neighborhood Housing Service of Asheville, Design Corp. of Raleigh, Bountiful Cities, Center for Participatory Change, Lightshare, The Conservation Fund, Western North Carolinas Communities, Warren Wilson College, UNC-Asheville, WNC WebWorx, YUSA, YMCA, ABIPA, Asheville area Habitat for Humanity, and Anonymous Donors.

Name something that you would like to see to make your neighborhood better?

The Shiloh Community Association would like to see and is in great need of acquiring a Resource Center to better transact community business. A bathroom in needed at the community garden site. The Association needs self sufficient sustainable funding and would like to see increased resident participation in the Shiloh Community Association.

Click here to see all of the neighborhoods profiled so far.

Leave a Comment December 4, 2013

Neighborhood Profile: Five Points Neighborhood

This is the latest in a series of profiles highlighting the City of Asheville’s vibrant and diverse neighborhoods. The City of Asheville maintains a list of neighborhoods who have registered as official organizations. Each month we will invite one of these to tell you a little more about the place they call home. If you are not sure if your neighborhood is on our listing, please contact Neighborhood Coordinator Marsha Stickford at mstickford@ashevillenc.gov.

Name of group: Five Points Neighborhood Association
Formed when: Formed in the mid 1990s
Location: Five Points neighborhood is situated about a mile north of the city of Asheville. It sits between Merrimon Avenue and Broadway and continues north to North Street near UNC Asheville.

What qualities make your neighborhood unique?

Many of the houses are historic and beautiful wooden bungalows and craftsman 4 squares built between 1900 and 1925. The neighborhood is centrally located, and great for walking or biking into town, Montford, UNC Asheville, and local schools. We have sidewalks on most of our streets.

Who are the people that make up your neighborhood?

There is an eclectic mix of people living in Five Points–the neighbors generally know each other and help each other out. Some folks have lived in the neighborhood for generations, but now we are seeing more young families moving in, as well as recent retirees looking for a walkable neighborhood experience. We have professionals, craftsmen, teachers, professors, students, chefs, acupuncturists, health care workers, many artists, activists, musicians, photographers and fantastic gardeners.

What is some of your neighborhood’s history?

The neighborhood was one of the first bedroom communities in the City of Asheville. The streetcar service used to run up to Mt. Clare Avenue and end at Hillside, an area we call Little Five Points. That is why that street is wider than any of the others. The estate of Mr. George Pack, of Pack Square fame in Asheville sat where the new Harris Teeter site sits today. The estate was called Many Oaks and there was a large mansion there with a grand stone wall encircling it. In the 1970s the building fell into disrepair and it was demolished. The neighborhood, like most of the city of Asheville went through a rough patch but began to revive again in the 1990s.

What role does your neighborhood play as part of Asheville’s community?

Our neighbors care deeply about local government, the environment, safety and helping Asheville to be a more progressive city. We are a vocal group of concerned citizens. We have worked closely with the city, helping government understand our needs and concerns, most recently regarding the highway business zoning of the Harris Teeter site. Also, there is a program going on to help solarize Asheville neighborhoods. Many of our neighbors in Five Points will be incorporating solar power into their homes in the coming months. There is also talk of a community garden.

What are some of the things you look forward to in the future of your neighborhood?

We look forward to traffic calming on some of our streets because of new development on Merrimon. We have concerns about cut through traffic and congestion on our very narrow city streets. We have been working closely with the city’s traffic department to facilitate this. We’d like to see sidewalks on streets that are lacking them. Graffiti is also problem in our neighborhood; we’d like to see less of it, and possibly more art in its place.

Name something that you would like to see to make your neighborhood better.

We would like a good buffer between the Harris Teeter site and the neighborhood homes, safe streets without fear of speeding cars and cut through traffic. Less graffiti and more gardens and art, more block parties, pot luck dinners, preservation of houses and good neighbors.

Leave a Comment October 24, 2013

Neighborhood Profile: West End/Clingman Avenue Neighborhood, Inc.

This is the first in a series of profiles highlighting the City of Asheville’s vibrant and diverse neighborhoods. The City of Asheville maintains a list of neighborhoods who have registered as official organizations. Each month we will invite one of these to tell you a little more about the place they call home. If you are not sure if your neighborhood is on our listing, please contact Neighborhood Coordinator Marsha Stickford at mstickford@ashevillenc.gov.

West End/Clingman Avenue Neighborhood, Inc. Formed, November 1998

Answers provided by the WECAN Board of Directors

What qualities make your neighborhood unique?

WECAN is one of Asheville’s oldest neighborhoods. Located at the West end of downtown, it overlooks the French Broad River. It is accessed by the interstate, state and city roads and is intersected by the railroad. WECAN is a short walk from Aston Park, Jean Webb Park and Owens-Bell Park, Isaac Dickson Elementary School, Asheville Middle School and the YWCA. It contains a significant portion of unused DOT right of way land, and is home to several National Register Historic buildings. WECAN has a logo, a neighborhood sign, and is incorporated as a tax-exempt non-profit organization. We maintain two gardens and have performed Adopt-A-Highway cleanups for 15 years.

Who are the people that make up your neighborhood?

WECAN is made up of a collection of races, ages, and incomes. We are retirees, singles, families and children. We are artists, bicyclists, urban farmers, bee keepers, pet lovers, new-comers and long time residents. We are people who care about our neighbors and where we live.

Describe some of your neighborhood’s history.

People began settling in WECAN in the 1890′s with the coming of the railroad and cotton mills. The first half of the twentieth century saw a boom in housing as the city grew. The 1916 flood, the end of rail and trolley service, the closing of the mills and major highway projects all took their toll on the neighborhood. The second half of the 20th Century saw a period of neglect until the dramatic 1995 Cotton Mill fire shone a spotlight on the area. Soon the city produced the West End/Clingman Avenue Asheville 2010 plan. One thing the plan called for was the formation of the neighborhood organization, which has met monthly since 1998. Since then, WECAN residents have been involved in many planning projects including a Citizens Master Plan. We have seen new infill development, a new park, neighborhood cleanups, some new sidewalks, new LED lighting. We produced a history exhibit, a video, an annual newsletter, public art and, in the last year, WECAN welcomed four babies.

What role does your neighborhood play as part of Asheville’s community?

We are a microcosm of the greater city. We share the same concerns as other neighborhoods, such as gentrification, traffic, taxes, crime, encroaching commercial development, affordability, communication, preservation, prostitution, density, development, homelessness, drug abuse, and infrastructure issues.

What are some of the things you look forward to in the future of your neighborhood?

The neighborhood will feel the impact of several projects in the coming years such as the New Belgium Brewery, traffic realignment on Riverside Drive, new residential development at 100 Park Avenue, mixed use development at the old Dave Steel site, a new greenway in the forest behind the east side of Clingman Avenue, the I-26 Connector and new development in the River Arts District.

Name some things that you would like to see to make your neighborhood better.

A respect for the history of the neighborhood, more affordable housing, a partnership with DOT for a community garden on unused land, a grocery store, sidewalks on Roberts street between the traffic circle and the White Duck, and more neighborhood participation.

Leave a Comment September 23, 2013


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